Ownership of iguide

Have an opportunity to scan a cancer clinic so their clients can see what they offer and the inside of the lab.

Customer is wondering what happens long term to the usage of the iguide, I understand you can unlock it past 1 year hosting. But they plan on using this for years to come. Is there any information on long term use of an iguide, or can it be downloaded and hosted on say their website forever?

A complete replica of what iGUIDE produces for you can be downloaded as a ZIP file. The entire structure is in that file and it only needs to be uncompressed and put in the appropriate directory on your website to be accessible. It’s completely self-contained.

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As @TheDeftGroup pointed out, you can download the entire iGuide (consisting of files and folders) and host it on the client’s website (or alternatively, your own website, a company intranet, your phone or tablet, etc.)

It’s a straight forward and very useful feature of the iGuide system.

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While Planitar makes claims to hosting on a tablet or phone - I have had no success, and they do not actually support this feature.

Desktop, laptop, self-hosting yes. Tablets and phones, no.

Not straightforward at all in my experience.

What happened when you tried?

It’s not magic. It’s just a collection of files and folders that is served by a remote host, or a local machine like a phone or tablet.

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I’ve only tried this once so that I could have a copy to show prospective clients on my iPad mini and it worked exactly as I expected it would.
Give it another go, it’s well explained in the instructions posted above. :slight_smile:

I disagree - it is not well explained, and does not work on my iPad or my Android phone.
I’m no newbie to computers or various platforms, but could not get it to work with any consistent results, so therefore am uncomfortable showing it to clients that way.
Please share your magic, because, as I mentioned earlier - Planitar was clear that they do NOT support this feature on tablets or phones, they just claim it can be done and use it as a sales tactic.
Computer - easy peesy. Tablets and phones, not so much.

Wait …what?
Where did you see this?

Also, I was told by the sales person this was a feature.

Also a post earlier today
"As @TheDeftGroup pointed out, you can download the entire iGuide (consisting of files and folders) and host it on the client’s website (or alternatively, your own website, a company intranet, your phone or tablet, etc.)

It’s a straight forward and very useful feature of the iGuide system."

Useful, yes. Straightforward on a phone or tablet - no.

Also a post earlier today

You’re quoting me, an independent iGuide operator (like you)? Don’t confound Planitar with individual operators.

Does anyone actually know how to successfully put an iGuide onto a tablet or phone?

That would be truly useful information - if anyone is willing to share.

I have not been able to do it successfully.

Thank you in advance for any help.

Hello. You can download the offline iguide and place on your device. You will need to download an html editor app or similar as these devices don’t generally support local html in the built in browser. Then you can open it from there.

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I just spent 5 minutes trying this and have it working on my iPhone and iPad.

It really is straight forward, though more complicated on iOS than on Android, presumably because of Apple’s closed-off approach. (I don’t have an Android device, but if I were to run an Android Virtual Machine, I expect that opening an offline iGuide’s index.html file would be trivial.)

Here’s an overview of what I just did.

  1. DOWNLOAD: Download the offline iGuide. Unzip it.

  2. PICK A VIEWER APP: Since it sounds like iOS makes it complicated to open local files in a browser, you need to use an alternative to “view” the offline iGuide. Planitar has given you two suggestions already, I went with the free and excellent Readdle Documents app. See ‎Documents: Files, PDF, Browser on the App Store.

  3. TRANSFER: Next you need to transfer the offline iGuide files onto your iPhone or iPad. You could probably use iTunes, iCloud Drive, or other methods, but I used Documents’ very simple Wi-Fi Transfer feature to drag and drop the offline iGuide to my phone in a matter of seconds. See How to Transfer Pictures from iPhone to Computer | Documents.

  4. VIEW: In Documents 5, open the index.html for that offline iGuide and you’ll have the full iGuide running locally on your device.

These steps make it sound more complicated than it is. It’s really just a matter of picking a viewer app for iOS (which may not be necessary on Android – I haven’t tried), and then transferring offline iGuides to your device for viewing.

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One more thing, it looks like you’re new to the iGuide forums. We are independent iGuide operators here who are juggling busy season and trying to help each other out with tips, suggestions, and answers.

When asking for help, you’ll get better results by being open to answers than you will by suggesting nefarious “sales tactics” and whatnot.

these devices don’t generally support local html in the built in browser.

That’s the key right there.

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Did you, perhaps, read the first line of their documentation?

Use of Offline iGUIDEs on mobile devices is not officially supported.

It’s good practice to not make purchasing decsions based on unsupported features unless you’ve tried them out ahead of time to ensure they work in your environment.

I recently did an iGuide for a small museum as they received a gov’t grant to assist with digitizing the museum and its exhibits. I suggested they download the offline version of the iGuide, but also that they embed the code on their website for the iGuide. Hoping that will work for them in the long term.

Both of those methods are simple for a web designer (or even a non-designer who is tech savvy).